The Watchdog AM 1600 WKKX
Listen to AM 1370 WVLY Now! Listen to AM 1370 WVLY Now!
Click here to be instantly connected
Home Shows News Podcasts Video Sports Advertise with Us Contact Us

Steve Novotney Says, "The Oath Approaches"

OK, so I was sort of afraid this week to check "the real" Donald Trump's Twitter account while I watched President Barack Obama's "farewell speech" in Chicago Tuesday night, the city in which his political career sprouted.

But who can help themselves, right?

So here I go …

"FAKE NEWS - A TOTAL POLITICAL WITCH HUNT!"

And that was it, as of late Tuesday evening, anyway; that's what Trump had tweeted.

And then there was Wednesday morning …

"Russia just said the unverified report paid for by political opponents is "A COMPLETE AND TOTAL FABRICATION, UTTER NONSENSE.""

"Russia has never tried to use leverage over me. I HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH RUSSIA - NO DEALS, NO LOANS, NO NOTHING!"

"I win an election easily, a great "movement" is verified, and crooked opponents try to belittle our victory with FAKE NEWS. A sorry state!"

"Intelligence agencies should never have allowed this fake news to "leak" into the public. One last shot at me. Are we living in Nazi Germany?"

The thing is we the people, please remember, don't know what to expect right now. Donald Trump is a Twitter addict, and no one knows if someone will take over his account once he's president or if he will continue tweeting even during the early morning hours. He is the celebrity who has successfully branded himself the political anomaly, a sudo non-insider who's been on the deep-inside of the American political landscape for more than two decades.

Why else would Bill and Hillary Clinton attend Trump's wedding when the president-elect married his third and current wife, Melania?

It's just over a week before the Inauguration, the country remains divided, and hecklers have haunted most recent political events including the president's final speech and the beginning of the nominee session with Sen. Jeff Sessions, Trump's pick for Attorney General. But one conversation seems a constant right now, and it concerns the respect for the office of president of the United States.

Through the years, I have voted in presidential elections since George H.W. Bush defeated Michael Dukakis in 1988, and I have five winners and three losers on my record. My votes consistently have been cast in favor of an improved economy and additional equality, but this past general election, in my opinion, didn't offer such a combination with either candidate.

And here it comes, "The Donald" as the POTUS, and he's pledged to do the job just as he's gone about being a brash and brazen businessman with penchants for pretty ladies, international travels, and the sparkle for extravagance. Most folks in America have known something about the president-elect since his first Manhattan hotel opened in 1978, and for the past 38 years we have watched the spectacle he and his family have been in the press and for 11 years on television.

He intrigues us.

Trump likes the camera, the soon-to-be 45th president does, and people voted for him because Trump is unusual, and he's rich, and the people want some of both. The country's older voters can recall what the American Dream once looked like and realize their grandchildren can't see the same, and many of today's parents continue to house their children with college degrees because of loan debt and living-wage employment opportunities.

It's not good, still, despite slow-but-steady economic progress the past eight years since President Obama inherited broke banks and the bankrupt businesses and citizens weaved within the meltdown of 2008; so what happens next with issues such as health care, national defense, foreign affairs, and social equality is anyone's guess.

People are anxious and nervous, and some have hope while his detractors believe Trump is destined for an impeachment. The ONLY "sure thing" is that the national news coverage will be swift and constant and likely designed to keep that public division stoked for the sake of the "cha-ching" that accompanies high ratings.

Remember that, no matter what side of the aisle you choose.

Categories: Commentary